Resty Core – The Good, The Bad, and the JIT-y

OpenResty’s biggest selling point is its performance. Embedding Lua allows for some pretty cool new features to pop into a simple Nginx proxy, and the synchronous but non-blocking paradigm introduced by hooking into the event loop (thanks, epoll!) is awesome, but the OpenResty stack as a whole really shines when everything is tied together under the umbrella of approaching, crossing, and then shattering C10k. Out of the box, Lua code embedded into any number of phase handlers runs at an impressive speed, and with the flick of a switch, we can really kick things into high gear.

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Benchmarking Simple String Comparison Options for OpenResty

Perhaps one of the most powerful primatives that lua-nginx-module provides out of the box is a sane, simple wrapper for regular expression operations (via PCRE). String matching, replacing (and now splitting!) via regex allows for much greater flexibility in string processing than Lua’s native string library. Recently while cleaning up an OpenResty InfluxDB client I needed to do some simple string comparison. My knee-jerk reaction was to use a simple expression in ngx.re.find, but I had a hunch that the overhead of using the PCRE lib would be a waste, and that native Lua pattern searches would be quicker. Time for a benchmark to figure out the most sane solution!

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Properly Scoping lua-nginx-module’s ngx.ctx

Some time ago I wrote a comparison of lua-nginx-module’s per-request context table and per-worker shared memory dictionaries. Silly me- our examination of the usage of hitting ngx.ctx is pretty naive. Of course, constantly doing the magic lookup to get to the table will be expensive. What happens when we localize the table, do our work, and shove it back into the ngx API at the end of our handler?

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FreeWAF Updates and New Features

January tends to be a pretty quiet month in the admin/operations world. Most people are still coming back from holiday, new yearly plans are being made, meetings are held, and the server monkeys… sit and watch the graphs scroll by. The rest of the world’s gradual return to work means the start of a seasonal upswing, but we’re still in a relatively low point, so that generally means a light workload. That extra free time has given me a chance to put in a good chunk of work towards FreeWAF, cleaning up code, adding new features, and interacting with a total stranger (score!). I’ve just tagged a new release, v0.4, which provides a handful of new features that were sorely missing:

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Graveyard Tarpittin’

One of the advantages of having a rotating graveyard schedule (two weeks of 10 PM shifts, followed by two months of normal living) is that quiet nights allow for copious amounts of time to muck around on the Internet. One topic that’s piqued my interest over the last few days is tarpitting. Purposefully delaying responses seems a little more interesting than strictly rate limiting; it’s a little more of a retaliatory attitude, without causing any damage at the other end of the connection. Most of the writing I’ve found related to the idea is focused on lower-layer implementation (e.g. the TARPIT iptables module) or SMTP, so I decided to roll my own for HTTP services.

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FreeWAF: A High-Performance, Scalable, Open Web Firewall

I’ve spent the better part of the last six months reworking the project I wrote for my Master’s thesis. The idea behind the project was to explore the costs, risks and requirements associated with developing a cloud WAF infrastructure, similar to what commercial cloud security providers like Cloudflare and Incapsula provide- and then provide that service free of charge. Totally unsustainable, of course, but as an academic exercise it was an incredibly educating experience. I’ve since decided to focus on releasing the source of the firewall engine powering the service, continuing to develop features and exploring new methods of anomalous and malicious behavior detection.

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Openresty Time Resolution With FFI – A More Accurate Approach

In looking for ways to further optimize my poorly-written Lua WAF (don’t worry, we’ll get there eventually), I’ve recently found that Openresty’s timing API is a bit lacking. Specifically, the time calls used within each transaction seems to only have millisecond granularity. This is fine for more complex applications which run over tens or hundreds of milliseconds, but in analyzing small sections of framework code, I wanted to have a more clear picture of how long each phase handler was taking (and the patronizingly PR-esque phrase “sub-millisecond processing time” was getting really annoying to hear in my head). A quick bounce to the Openresty mailing list got me on the right track:

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OpenResty Performance – ngx.ctx vs ngx.shared.dict

The Nginx Lua module provides two structures for maintaining Lua-land data: per-request context tables, and shared memory zones. Each has its pros and cons; ngx.ctx can store arbitrarily complex Lua structures, and only live within a single transaction’s lifecycle. Conversely, shared dictionaries are capable of storing key/value pairs as Lua primitives (complex Lua structures must be serialized to be stored in a shared dictionary); the lifetime of a shared dictionary’s contents is the lifetime of the master nginx process (dictionary contents survive HUP signals). Additionally, the Lua module documentation notes that ngx.ctx performance is slow:

The ngx.ctx lookup requires relatively expensive metamethod calls and it is much slower than explicitly passing per-request data along by your own function arguments. So do not abuse this API for saving your own function arguments because it usually has quite some performance impact.

A similar note appears in the documentation under the ngx.var API call; no such note lives in the shared dictionary documentation. Given that shared dictionaries can be leveraged to store per-request data in a manner similar to the context table (for primitive values), I wanted to see if there is a noticeable difference between the two methods:

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